FusionOps: Almost Half of Americans Predict Stress Due to Possible Holiday Gift Shortage

holiday shoppingA third of Americans claim manufacturers should be blamed for fights caused if a Holiday gift shortage was to occur.

FusionOps, the supply chain insights company, has released a new survey gauging Americans’ reactions should retailers run out of hot holiday gifts and the potential havoc such shortages could wreak on the holiday. With the economy better, this could be a real possibility for the 2015 holiday shopping season. Forty-five percent of Americans say that the most likely result of holiday gift shortages would be temper tantrums, and that a shortage of smartphones would cause the biggest problems for consumers during the holiday season (36 percent). Almost 1 in 4 (23 percent) of Americans would be willing to “play dirty” if that’s what it took to walk out of a store with the last hot holiday gift. This was especially true of students age 18+ (36 percent) and parents with children under age 18 in the household (37 percent) compared to those with no children under age 18 in the household (16 percent).

Some Americans think that the most likely result of a holiday gift shortage is temper tantrums (45 percent) and we’ve all seen those happen. Interestingly, students age 18+ predict this – and other repercussions – more vigorously than parents do.

Other results from a holiday gift shortage include: crying, a ruined Christmas Day, fights and even an increase in crime.

Whether or not the students age 18+ were predicting their own reactions to holiday gift shortages cannot be deduced from the data.

When asked who should be held responsible if family fights break out as a result of a holiday gift shortage, if there is one, Americans readily pointed the finger at manufacturers (37 percent), followed by retail stores (27 percent) and, in a distant third place, parents (13 percent).

“Predicting the future is hard, no doubt, but with so many technology advancements surrounding consumers today, they are less forgiving and more frustrated with manufacturers that can’t anticipate possible shortages,” said Gary Meyers, CEO of FusionOps. “For businesses serious about brand reputation and customer loyalty, it is time to leverage the massive amount of business data to mitigate risk and maximize the sales opportunity that comes only once per year.”

When asked which hot holiday gift shortage would cause the biggest problem for consumers this holiday season, 36 percent of Americans name smartphones. Twenty-nine percent feel the biggest problem would be caused by video game shortages such as Guitar Hero Live, Call of Duty Black Ops 3, and Star Wars Battlefront; 28 percent cite a tablet shortage, 24 percent say Star Wars toys and 22 percent say smart watches.

No surprise here, students age 18+ and parents with children under age 18 most likely to play dirty for Christmas toys.

Twenty-three percent of Americans say they’d be willing to behave unethically if it meant leaving a retail store with the last hot holiday gift. This number was highest among students age 18+ (36 percent), parents of children under age 18 (37 percent compared to 16 percent among those with no children under age 18), and the employed (29 percent) – only 16 percent of unemployed Americans would be willing to behave unethically to score the last hot holiday gift.

Twenty-seven percent of students age 18+ and 17 percent of parents with children under age 18 say they’d be willing to lie to other shoppers (compared to 7 percent of parents with no children under age 18); 14 percent of students age 18+ and 16 percent of parents with children under age 18 would be willing to cut in line (compared to 8 percent of parents with no children under age 18); and 13 percent of students age 18+ and 8 percent of parents with children under age 18 would be willing to knock an adult down (compared to 3 percent of parents with no children under age 18).

Nine percent of students age 18+ and 8 percent of parents admit they would even be willing to push over a child if it meant leaving with the last hot holiday gift (compared to 2 percent of parents with no children under age 18.)

Even the Presidential candidates could factor into the equation.

Forty percent of Americans and 51 percent of Millennials believe that one of the current presidential candidates is in a position to ensure there won’t be a holiday gift shortage of the items they want to buy.  When asked which 2016 candidate who, if they were President today, would be best at ensuring there won’t be a shortage, 20 percent say Donald Trump would be best at this, while 12 percent of general respondents (17 percent of Millennials) put their faith in Hillary Clinton. While the general respondents put less faith in Bernie Sanders on this front (7 percent) more Millennials (14 percent) think President Sanders would do an adequate job of ensuring hot gifts make it home for the holidays.

This survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of FusionOps from October 15-19, 2015 among 2,014 adults ages 18 and older. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables.

FusionOps put much time and effort into this survey, but they do this everyday as they provide the cloud-based analytics platform that mines the world’s information and makes it actionable to help people make faster, better business decisions. Thousands of users in over 80 countries worldwide rely on FusionOps to optimize their supply chain performance in order to improve operations, bottom-line business results and customer satisfaction. Unlike business intelligence tools, FusionOps is a cloud-based application that provides leading metrics to drive better decisions with information that is relevant and actionable. With FusionOps, companies can eliminate extensive costs and the resources spent developing their own supply chain applications and improve time to value. See more at www.fusionops.com.

Rick Limpert

Rick Limpert is an award winning Atlanta-based freelance writer, columnist, host of The Tech of Sports Podcast and best-selling author. He has covered sports, technology and events all over the world. His works have been featured on Yahoo Sports, Yahoo News, Examiner.com, nba.com and in Sports Illustrated.

Send this to a friend